Uk and the Netherlands ask the US and China to speed up the introduction of a ban on internal combustion engines

Uk and the Netherlands ask the US and China to speed up the introduction of a ban on internal combustion engines

FineAuto

Members of the governments of the UK and the Netherlands have called on the US and Chinese authorities to ban the sale of cars with internal combustion engines by 2035. According to Electrek, the statements are made ahead of the next UN conference on climate change: as the largest car markets, the United States and China can help achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement, as well as accelerate the reduction in the price of electric cars, Europeans say.

UK Transport Minister Grant Schapps and Dutch Secretary of State Stephen van Weijenberg are asking the US and China to support EU plans and completely ban petrol and diesel cars from 2035. In the UK and the Netherlands, traditional cars will be abandoned in 2030, and from 2035 ICEs will be completely banned, including in hybrid installations.

Combining efforts of countries and automakers will spur the development of electric cars and help reduce their cost faster, added the authors of the appeal. According to current forecasts, “green” cars will not be more expensive than fuel cars by about 2025.

China has already published an electrification plan, which, however, does not talk about the complete cessation of CO emissions ?. According to him, from 2035 all cars on the market must have electric or hybrid power plants. As for the United States, the country has not yet developed a nationwide scenario to abandon the internal combustion engine. Only local bans are planned: moratoriums on gasoline and diesel cars are going to be introduced in the states of California, Washington and New York

However, not everyone in Europe agrees with the ban on the sale of cars with internal combustion engines, which in 2035 should affect all 27 EU countries. Czech Prime Minister Andrei Babis spoke out against, calling the supporters of the idea “green fanatics” and stating that the government has no right to impose anyone’s opinion on the market.

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